Promoting Education and Training

Work With Dads

Promoting Education and Training

Structural economic changes have led to declining employment opportunities and reduced economic stability and security for many young men. Although some young fathers decide to drop out of high school or forego other educational opportunities to find work so they can provide for their child financially, this is generally not a good long-term approach. As one practitioner has noted, this “all-too-common practice … is a trap. First, the amount of hours required to gain any reasonable income on the low wages paid will leave the father with little energy to put into child or relationship. Second, the long-term financial prospects for child and family look much more positive for fathers with tertiary qualifications.”16 Fatherhood programs can encourage young fathers to complete high school or obtain a GED, get post-secondary education and training, and pursue apprenticeships or other methods of getting skills needed to earn a living wage. One good strategy is to form partnerships with community colleges and other agencies that can help young men work toward educational or vocational goals.

Visit the Economic Stability/ Employment page for additional resources on helping fathers improve their economic stability.