The Context of Prison-based Work with Fathers

Work With Dads

The Context of Prison-based Work with Fathers

  • In a prison-based fatherhood program, the average participant is likely to be in his late 20s or early 30s; divorced, separated, or never married; a drug user in the month before arrest; and a high school dropout.[21]
  • Fathers in state prison are likely to be slightly younger than fathers in federal prison and less likely to be married or to have ever been married.[22]
  • A recent report indicates that only 23 percent of state prisoners are married, but many are involved in intimate or co-parenting relationships.[23]
  • Forty-four percent of fathers in state prisons and 55 percent in federal prisons reported living with at least one of their children prior to imprisonment, and a slightly lower percentage (36 percent in state prisons and 47 percent in federal prisons) had lived with their children in the month prior to their arrest.[24]
  • Many incarcerated fathers have child support obligations that far exceed their ability to pay.
  • A majority of parents in both state (62%) and federal (84%) prisons are held more than 100 miles away from their last place of residence.[25]
  • Incarcerated fathers on average spend 82 months in state prison and 105 months in federal prison.[26]