Predictors of Paternal Involvement Among Nonresidential, Black Fathers From Low-Income Neighborhoods.

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Journal Name
Psychology of Men and Masculinity (Advance online publication)
Page Count
14
Year Published
2013
Author (Individual)
Coates, Erica E.
Phares, Vicky.
Resource Type
Journal Article
Resource Format
PDF
This study examined the factors associated with higher levels of paternal involvement among nonresidential, Black fathers from low-income neighborhoods. Participants were 110 fathers of children up to the age of 10. Participants completed psychometrically sound measures of social support, religiosity, family-of-origin father closeness, coparenting relationship quality, psychological well-being, conviction history since the birth of the child, and paternal involvement. A simultaneous multiple regression indicated that better psychological well-being and coparenting relationship quality and lower conviction rates since the birth of the child were associated significantly with higher levels of paternal involvement when controlling for sociodemographic variables. Results of a mediational analysis revealed that coparenting relationship quality mediated the relationship of both psychological well-being and paternal involvement and conviction history since the birth of the child and paternal involvement. Results of a hierarchical regression showed that social support moderated the relationship between psychological well-being and paternal involvement when controlling for statistically relevant sociodemographic variables. This study provided evidence that several father and coparental factors were related to high levels of paternal involvement and illustrated the importance of examining disadvantaged fathers' strengths as targets for future interventions. Psychologists, social workers, program directors, and other individuals working with nonresidential, Black fathers from low-income neighborhoods should educate their clients on the factors associated with higher levels of paternal involvement as well as provide necessary resources to facilitate father involvement with children. (Author abstract)

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