Examining Multiple Dimensions of Father Involvement as Predictors of Risk-Taking Intentions among Black Adolescent Females.

Publication Year: 
2019
Personal Author: 
Cryer-Coupeta, Q., Dorsey, M., Lemmons, B., Hope, E.
Type of Resource: 
Journal Article
Page Count: 
10
Abstract: 

Although scholars have highlighted the differential impacts of father involvement on the outcomes of sons and daughters, less attention has been given to the impact of father involvement on Black adolescent females. This line of inquiry is important given the unique risks Black females face, such as increased likelihood of early unintended pregnancy, increasing rates of delinquency, and increased interaction with law enforcement. Given its potential impact, it is important to explore the ways in which father involvement matters to female adolescents’ intentions to engage in risky behaviors. The current study utilized a national, cross-sectional sample of 287 adolescent females from the Black Families Project. Participants ranged in age from 13 to 17 years old (M = 15.4 years; SD = 1.25) and completed the study survey via Qualtrics Panels. ANOVA results suggest that adolescent perceptions of father involvement differ by father residence type. A three-step hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to understand which dimensions of father involvement matter to a daughter’s intent to engage in risky behaviors. Results indicate that among Black female adolescents with biological resident and non-resident father-figures, significant predictors of their intent to engage in risky behaviors included father- daughter closeness and engagement in activities. These dimensions of father involvement were not significant for adolescents living in households with a social father. Implications for practice are discussed.

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