Health & Safety

Being an involved father requires engagement in all aspects of a child’s life, including health and safety. From knowing how to properly handle a cut or scrape, accompanying a child to regular doctor check-ups, to ensuring that a child receives their mandated vaccinations, involved fathers can make a significant, positive difference.

There are also curriculum and health resources available to support programs through local hospitals, existing pre-natal classes, and national fatherhood groups. 

On this Page

 
Webinars
May 18, 2017
 
This webinar presented information and resources to help fathers improve their own health and well-being, and the health and well-being of their children. We looked at how fatherhood programs can talk with fathers about topics such as healthy eating and sleeping habits, healthy physical activity, and accessing preventive care. 
 
Presenters were: Charles Daniels, Founder/ CEO, Fathers' Uplift, Inc., Roxbury, MA; Craig Garfield, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; and, Albert Pless, Program Manager, Men's Health League, Cambridge Public Health Department, Cambridge, MA. 
 
The webinar was facilitated by Nigel Vann, National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse.
 
Material, including a Helpful Resources list, can be found in the Webinars section.
 
June 8, 2016
 
This webinar explored trauma-informed principles and look at their relevance for work in fatherhood program settings. It is likely that many participants in fatherhood programs have been exposed to trauma, perhaps as a result of violence in their families or communities; experiences before, during, or after incarceration; or as a result of military service. These experiences can impact key executive functioning skills such as how you think, feel, behave and relate to others.
 
Presenters were: Derrick Gordon, Ph.D., Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT; Kerri Pruitt, The Dannon Project, Birmingham, AL; and, Lamar Henderson, All Dads Matter, Merced, CA.
 
The webinar was facilitated by Nigel Vann, National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse. 
 
Material, including a Helpful Resources list, can be found in the Webinars section.
 
February 18, 2015
 
This webinar focused on ways in which fatherhood programs can talk with fathers about mental health issues. Specifically, it provided tips on helping fathers identify and address mental health and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) issues, talk about ways to address misperceptions about “mental illness,” and look at strategies to encourage prevention, resilience, and recovery.
 
Presenters were: Frank Blaney, L.A. Fathers Program, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, CA; Drs. Sophie de Figueiredo and Bridgid Conn, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, CA; Joe Jones, Center for Urban Families, Baltimore, MD; and, Dr. Tiffaney Parkman, University of Baltimore, MD
 
The webinar was facilitated by Nigel Vann, National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse. 
 
Material, including a Helpful Resources list, can be found in the Webinars section.
 
December 9, 2014
 
Bullying is a problem faced by many children at school, in the community, and online. Children may bully others, they may be victims of bullying behavior, or they may find themselves in a bystander role. This webinar focuses on ways in which fatherhood programs can address these and related issues with fathers and their local communities.
 
Presenters were: David Miller, National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse; Callahan Walsh, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children; and Michael Knowles, Chair, National PTA Male Engagement Committee
 
This webinar was facilitated by Patrick Patterson, National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse. 
 
Material, including a Helpful Resources list, can be found in the Webinars section.
 
 
NRFC Resources
This research brief with information and links to resources to help fathers improve their own health and well-being, and the health and well-being of their children.
 
This research report that provides an overview of previous research about men and depression, identifies factors associated with risk of depression for urban fathers, and offers tips on how fatherhood programs can help fathers identify and address symptoms of depression.
 
These tip sheets, drawing on data from the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, with information about common accidents for children at different ages and suggestions about how dads can help avoid these accidents: 
 
 

Fall 2013 Fatherhood Buzz: Men's Health Initiative

Fathers who model a healthy lifestyle can have a powerful and positive impact upon the development and health of their children. The Fall 2013 Fatherhood Buzz will focus on Men's Health. The Fall 2013 Fatherhood Buzz will be supporting community resources and barbershops with ways to help fathers be healthier, including resources to find local community health centers and ways to connect to health coverage.

Here are some tips to share with dads to help them stay healthy and engaged with their children and family:

  • Engage in physical activity with your children, such as taking a walk, go swimming or playing catch.
  • Eat and prepare healthy meals for you and your family. Visit ChooseMyPlate.Gov for more.
  • Visit your local community health center to get information about no or low cost health care for you and your family. Find a local center online by entering your zip code in the "Find a Health Center" box about halfway down the web page.
  • Be a good role model – exercise regularly, eat right, quit smoking and get covered.
  • If you don’t have insurance, go to Heathcare.gov or call 1-800-318-2596 to sign up to receive access to health care and preventive services that can lead to a lifetime of quality time with your family.

Learn more about the Fall 2013 Fatherhood Buzz: Men's Health Initiative.  

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Men’s Health Month
Encouraging fathers to take care of their own health needs is also important as a family issue. Healthy fathers are more available to emotionally and financially support their children and families. Modeling positive behavior through regular doctor appointments and adopting healthy habits is one of the best ways to encourage healthy behaviors in children.

Learn more about men’s health.

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Fatherhood and Safety
Keeping our families safe is a top priority for dads, families, and practitioners. There are a lot of things that count as safety – here are a few:

  • Emergency preparedness. Like preparing for natural disasters. The Kids section of Ready.gov has games and resources to help families expect the unexpected.
  • Transportation Safety. Car seats, bike helmets, airplane regulations. The Department of Transportation Safe Car Parent Central has resources on keeping children safe from car seat to new driver.
  • Food Safety. Stay on top of recalls, food preparation safe tips, and what to do in cases of food poisoning with FoodSafety.gov.
  • Physical Safety. Keeping your family physically safe comes in many forms. Preventing and treating injuries and infections is part of that effort. The Centers for Disease Control website provides many resources on staying safe.

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Other Relevant Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, list of health topics related for infants and children.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Maternal and Child Health Bureau
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Maternal and Child Health Bureau includes reports and links to other sites dealing with oral health, women's heath, and a health database.

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